Scientific Journal of Veterinary Advances http://sjournals.com/index.php/sjva <p>Scientific Journal of Veterinary (SJV)is a high-quality peer-reviewed well indexed scientific journal publishing original research findings on all aspects of veterinary sciences. Scope of the journal includes: pathology, microbiology, parasitology, physiology, pharmacology,veterinary medicine.</p> Sjournals en-US Scientific Journal of Veterinary Advances 2322-1879 In vivo lavicidal effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale) powder on pigs artificially infected with gastointestinal nematode larvae http://sjournals.com/index.php/sjva/article/view/18 <p>Anthelminthic resistance due to the mismanagement of conventional drugs remains a major constraint in eradicating gastrointestinal parasites, hence the need for alternatives drugs which are more ecofriendly and affordable. This paper evaluated the&nbsp;<em>In vivo</em>&nbsp;lavicidal effect of ginger&nbsp;<em>Zingiber</em>&nbsp;<em>officinale</em>&nbsp;in pigs experimentally infected with association of&nbsp;<em>Strongyloides ransomi, Hyostrongylus rubidus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis&nbsp;</em>and<em>&nbsp;Globocephalus urosubulatus&nbsp;</em>L3<em>&nbsp;</em>larvae. The experiment, conducted at the teaching and research farm of the University of Dschang consisted of 12 pigs divided into two treatment groups (the control group, T0 and the treated group, T1). The control group (T0) was infected with 2650L<sub>3</sub>&nbsp;larvae and was not treated. The treated group (T1) was infected with 2650L<sub>3</sub>&nbsp;larvae and treated with 500g of ginger powder. Six weeks after infection, faecal samples were collected directly from the rectum of all the pigs to determine the presence of eggs, the faecal egg count, and also to carry out larval culture. Ginger powder reduced the shedding of eggs in&nbsp;<em>Strongyloides ransomi</em>&nbsp;and strongylid parasites by 12.9% and 53.4% respectively. The mean log10 EPG in the untreated group was also significantly higher than that in the treated group. The L<sub>3</sub>&nbsp;larvae obtained after larval culture were of the same species as those used to infect the pigs. The larvae cultures showed that ginger reduced the shedding of eggs in&nbsp;<em>Strongyloides ransomi, Hyostrongylus rubidus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis&nbsp;</em>and<em>&nbsp;Globocephalus urosubulatus</em>&nbsp;by 32.97%, 18.84%, 9.46%, and 17.41% respectively. The mean L3 nematode larvae cultured in the treated group was significantly lower (p&lt;0.05) than in the untreated group for<em>&nbsp;</em><em>Strongyloides ransomi</em>&nbsp;and<em>&nbsp;Trichostrongylus colubriformis.</em>&nbsp;In conclusion, ginger powder reduced the shedding of eggs of all the studied nematode species, and the eggs shed were viable. In order to definitely conclude on the effect of ginger powder on these nematodes in pigs, further studies on the duration of treatment and the active compound in ginger powder are required.</p> Tracey Kiambom Marc K Kouam Alexis Teguia Copyright (c) 2020 Scientific Journal of Veterinary Advances 2020-03-18 2020-03-18 9 3 299 308