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On-farm evaluation of the effects of crop rotation system on bread wheat in Bale highlands, south-eastern Ethiopia

Mengistu Bogale, Girma Fana

Abstract


A crop rotation experiment was initiated at Sinana on-farm and Adaba locations in 2001. At both locations, the precursor crops used were food barley (Hordeum vulgare), faba bean (Vicia faba), field pea (Pisum sativum) and lin seed (Linum usitatissimum). Fertilizer levels used, were 0-0, 9-23 and 41-46 kg N-P2O5 ha-1. The experiment was laid out in randomized complete block design with three replications in factorial arrangement and it was conducted during the period from 2001 to 2010. Combined analysis of the results generated at each location during the period showed that rotation had a significant effect on wheat grain yield and most yield components of wheat both at Sinana and Adaba. At both locations, rotation with faba bean had a marked effect on the grain yield of wheat (4887.40 kg ha-1) and (3624.80 kg ha-1) at Sinana and Adaba, respectively. The next highest grain yield was recorded, wheat rotation with field pea at both locations. The lowest wheat grain yield was recorded, wheat rotation with barley (3945.00 kg ha-1) and (2355.90 kg ha-1) at Sinana and Adaba, respectively. Fertilizer rate had significant effect on most yield and yield components of Wheat at both locations. The highest fertilizer rate (41-46 kg N-P2O5 ha-1) recorded the highest grain yield (4689.5 kg ha-1) and (3397.1 kg ha-1) at Sinana and Adaba, respectively. The lowest grain yield was recorded from control plots. In general, from this long-term on-farm rotation trial it is possible to conclude that faba bean and field pea are beneficial break crops in Bale highlands to alleviate wheat production constraints arising due to continuous cereal mono-cropping systems.

References


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